Studies in the syntax of the Lindisfarne Gospels
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Studies in the syntax of the Lindisfarne Gospels with appendices on some idioms in the Germanic languages by Morgan Callaway

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Published by Johns Hopkins Press in Baltimore .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • England,
  • Northumbria (Kingdom)

Subjects:

  • Bible. N.T. Gospels.,
  • English language -- Old English, ca. 450-1100 -- Syntax.,
  • English language -- Old English, ca. 450-1100 -- Dialects -- England -- Northumbria (Kingdom),
  • Germanic languages -- Syntax.,
  • English language -- Old English, ca. 450-1100 -- Bibliography.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesLindisfarne Gospels.
Statementby Morgan Callaway, Jr.
SeriesHesperia. Supplementary series: studies in English philology ;, no. 5
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPE231.B6 C3
The Physical Object
Paginationxvi, 240 p. ;
Number of Pages240
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6614818M
LC Control Number19004023
OCLC/WorldCa1241319

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Get this from a library! Studies in the syntax of the Lindisfarne Gospels: with appendices on some idioms in the Germanic languages. [Morgan Callaway]. Full text of "Studies in the syntax of the Lindisfarne Gospels" See other formats. Full text of "Studies in the syntax of the Lindisfarne Gospels: with appendices on some idioms in the Germanic languages" See other formats. Abstract The use of the subjunctive mood in the Old English gloss to the Lindisfarne Gospels is investigated. All the examples of the Latin third person singular imperfect subjunctive, esset, are examined. There are three aims: to contribute to understanding the use of the subjunctive in the gloss of the Lindisfarne Gospels; to add to the authorship debate; to explore the question of how much Author: Johanna L. Wood.

Studies in the syntax of the Lindisfame Gospels. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press. Cook, Albert S. A glossary of the Old Northumbrian Gospels (Lindisfame Gospels or Durham Books). (Compiled by Albert S. Cook) Halle: Max Niemeyer. Derolez, Rene "Anglo-Saxon glossography: A brief introduction", in: Rene Derolez (ed.), The Lindisfarne Glosses are very important to: our understanding of early Old English morphology and syntax. They reveal special insights, e.g. the absence of third person null subjects (Berndt ; van Gelderen ), the early loss of verbal inflection, a possible definite article (Carpenter ; Ross ), and the (early) use of multiple negatives (Nagucka ). See more Lindisfarne Gospels Book | Ray Simpson PB Email to friends Share on Facebook - opens in a new window or tab Share on Twitter Studies In Syntax Lindisfarne Gospels Germanic Morgan Callaway Facsimile SB Book. £ + £ P&P. Picture Information. terlinear native glosses to the four gospels in two manuscripts-the older manuscript being designated as the Lindisfarne Gloss and the younger as the Rushworth Gloss;2 (3) interlinear glosses to a Latin Ritual Book from 1 The finest of these studies of Old English case-syntax is that of J. E. Wiilfing, Syntax.

The Kingdom of Northumbria (/ n ɔːr ˈ θ ʌ m b r i ə /; Old English: Norþanhymbra Rīċe; Latin: Regnum Northanhymbrorum) was a medieval Anglian kingdom in what is now Northern England and south-east name derives from the Old English Norþan-hymbre meaning "the people or province north of the Humber", which reflects the approximate southern limit to the kingdom's territory Capital: Northern: Bamburgh, Southern: York.   This volume analyses Late Northumbrian verbal morphosyntax as recorded in the OE gloss to the Lindisfarne Gospels. It challenges the traditional EME dating attributed to the emergence of subject-type concord in the North of England and demonstrates that the syntactic configuration of the Northern Subject Rule was already a feature of Old : The “Lindisfarne” Gospels, perhaps the most famous and arrestingly beautiful suriving product of early Insular book production, is now better known than ever, thanks in no small measure to two volumes of essays by Michelle Brown in and and, more recently, its much anticipated homecoming exibition in Durham Cathedral this past summer. On the syntactic differences between OE dialects: Evidence from the Gospels Article in English Language and Linguistics 13(01) - 75 March with 22 Reads How we measure 'reads'.